Mike Cope's blog

Thursday, June 24, 2004

I'm worn out from baseball. All-star practice is in its second week. Our first game is July 1. On the first day of practice, I gave the parents and the players the "this isn't all about winning" speech. As the first game gets closer, I think I need that speech played back to me! This morning I once again give thanks that Claritin D is now available over the counter. Life's small pleasures. Well-executed drag bunts, well-thrown off-speed pitches, well-behaving parents, and Claritin D.

29 Comments:

  • "Well-executed drag bunts"

    ...

    Maybe it's just me (and my complete ignorance of the finer technical points of baseball), but this just does not sound like anything for which I could earnestly give thanks.

    It sounds more like something I should avoid, in fact, and give thanks for the lack of. ^_~

    By Blogger Q, at 6/24/2004 07:55:00 AM  

  • I've seen well-executed drag bunts and well-thrown pitches. I've even taken Claritin D. But if you think that as the manager of the all-star team you're going to have well-behaving parents -- then I'm suspicious that you're taking too much Claritin D and are experiencing hallucinations.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 6/24/2004 07:56:00 AM  

  • Mike,

    Which do you find more facinating?

    The perfect drag bunt that just hugs the line and comes to rest barely in fair territory OR the way that little Claritin D pill just disolves in your mouth? Both are pretty cool.

    Or consider this: which is more desirable?

    The pitch that is released high and looks like the fastball but breaks off the table at the last second OR the parent who usually breaks down and loses control and just stays in line the entire game?

    By Blogger Joel Quile, at 6/24/2004 08:24:00 AM  

  • There's no crying in baseball...particularly from the manager. Just take it one game at a time... Remember it's a team sport...
    Thought I would give you some of my favorite cliches to take the pressure off. By the way, the parents only get mad if you lose and their kid sits the bench or doesn't play short stop or you made them bunt or ....

    By Blogger Craig, at 6/24/2004 08:45:00 AM  

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    By Blogger Nancyk, at 6/24/2004 10:39:00 AM  

  • allstars--behaving parents--isn't that an oxymoron?

    By Blogger Nancyk, at 6/24/2004 10:41:00 AM  

  • Off-speed pitches?

    Mike, do you limit what kinds of junk your kids can throw? Or is the risk I've read about related to letting young 'uns throw curves & sliders just hype?

    Just curious.

    By Blogger Terry Austin, at 6/24/2004 11:06:00 AM  

  • TA - I'm very conscientious about the type of junk they throw. I have no doubt that many younger kids hurt their arms. There is a way for a kid to throw a curve that doesn't put the pressure on the elbow/arm that a regular curve ball does. I've got two kids who can throw it that way and the ball still breaks quite a bit. For a couple others, it doesn't break much -- but it still functions as an off-speed. The only kid we have who was throwing a good slider was throwing it wrong in a way that could hurt his arm, so we switched to the curve. And there's always the "circle change-up" (moving the ball over one finger with the same motion as the fastball) that almost any kid can throw without extra strain. I'm probably not telling you anything you didn't already know. Basically, YES, you need to be careful about hurting a kid's arm--especially with curves where the elbow "snaps."

    By Blogger Mike, at 6/24/2004 11:21:00 AM  

  • Amazing! My thirteen-year-old was showing me the circle change-up the other day. I've played baseball all my life, and had never heard of it until then, and actually thought he had made it up just to confuse me. Then, you use the same term today. What are the odds? (Maybe I just don't know anything about pitching, and the odds of that are pretty good.)

    don

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 6/24/2004 11:28:00 AM  

  • Nolan Ryan threw one of the Nastiest circle change ups ever. I think that pitch is second only to a wicked splitter for a power pitcher to follow up a few heaters with to get a hitter off balance.

    just in case you wanted to know...

    By Blogger Joel Quile, at 6/24/2004 12:15:00 PM  

  • I love boy language

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 6/24/2004 02:38:00 PM  

  • Normally if someone's talking about something I'm completely ignorant of, I'd start a side conversation about something equally obscure to them. Only in my case, that's Hebrew, Greek, and general Bible stuff -- and I have a hunch a *couple* of people might not be so out of their depths there... (Well, except maybe the from birth c of C'ers in the old testament stuff... ^_~ -- just kidding! Don't kill me!)

    By Blogger Q, at 6/24/2004 02:51:00 PM  

  • Q,

    Well, of course, you know that baseball was invented by God in the Big Inning. I know! It's an old joke and not a great one at that.

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 6/24/2004 04:19:00 PM  

  • Of course it was. The eighth commandment was originally "Thou shalt not steal, unless given the sign by the third base coach", but was shortened after Moses broke the tablets. He was charged with an error.

    don

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 6/25/2004 07:19:00 AM  

  • Of course it was. The eighth commandment was originally "Thou shalt not steal, unless given the sign by the third base coach", but was shortened after Moses broke the tablets. He was charged with an error.

    don

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 6/25/2004 07:19:00 AM  

  • Of course it was. The 8th commandment was originally "Thou shalt not steal, unless given the sign by the third base coach", but was shortened after Moses dropped the tablets. He was charged with an error.

    don

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 6/25/2004 07:21:00 AM  

  • sorry, the server went nuts and told me it wasn't posting that last comment. it was cute the first time, but not three times in a row.
    don

    By Anonymous Anonymous, at 6/25/2004 07:24:00 AM  

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    By Blogger Q, at 6/25/2004 07:30:00 AM  

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    By Blogger TCS, at 6/25/2004 08:46:00 AM  

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    By Blogger TCS, at 6/25/2004 08:47:00 AM  

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    By Blogger TCS, at 6/25/2004 08:53:00 AM  

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    By Blogger TCS, at 6/25/2004 08:53:00 AM  

  • Mike,
    I have to agree that coaching the parents is the biggest challenge. But, I wanted to share with you the most effective coaching technique I ever experienced in all my years of playing baseball. Back in high school my coach had a habit of leaving the dugout and going down the fence a way (toward the outfield) and throwing up. This occured after a error or sometimes missing a signal. There was no worse feeling if you made a fielding or throwing error, than to see Coach Leatherwood coming out of the dugout. You would rather be benched than cause a man to puke! Feel free to try this if needed.

    By Blogger TCS, at 6/25/2004 08:58:00 AM  

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    By Blogger TCS, at 6/25/2004 08:59:00 AM  

  • Maybe you should just require your parents to graduate from obedience school before they can attend the games.

    It's worth a shot...

    By Blogger Q, at 6/25/2004 09:46:00 AM  

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    By Blogger Q, at 6/25/2004 09:46:00 AM  

  • So, now everything is in triplicate?

    By Blogger Serena Voss, at 6/25/2004 10:06:00 AM  

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    By Blogger Serena Voss, at 6/25/2004 10:06:00 AM  

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    By Blogger Serena Voss, at 6/25/2004 10:06:00 AM  

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