Mike Cope's blog

Tuesday, November 01, 2005

A couple more pieces from C. S. Lewis about conversion and friendship: "I gave up Christianity at about fourteen. Came back to it when getting on for thirty. An almost purely philosophical conversion. I didn't want to. I'm not the religious type. I want to be let alone, to feel I'm my own master: but since the facts seemed to be the opposite I had to give in. My happiest hours are spent with three or four old friends in old clothes tramping together and putting up in small pubs--or else sitting up till the small hours in someone's college rooms talking nonsense, poetry, theology, metaphysics over beer, tea, or pipes. There's no sound I like better than adult male laughter." "You must picture me alone in that room in Magdalen, night after night, feeling, whenever my mind lifted even for a second from my work, the steady, unrelenting approach of Him Whom I so earnestly desired not to meet. That which I greatly feared had come upon me. In the Trinity Term of 1929 I gave in, and admitted that God was God, and knelt and prayed: perhaps, that night, the most dejected and reluctant convert in all England." Thanks so much for those wonderful memories of Narnia in yesterday's comments. - - - - And while we're thinking about books for children, I miss having one small enough to read Dr. Seuss to. Our all time fav? Go, Dog, Go.

35 Comments:

  • I'm a Fox in Sox man, m'self, but there's nothing like hearing my six-year-old daughter read One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish in her beautiful little voice (her speech devoid of the letter "r" though it may be), with expression and inflection!

    By Blogger Tim Castle, at 11/02/2005 04:45:00 AM  

  • I hate to get off the Dr. Seuss train of thought, but the best all time series of books at our house for little ones is "Harry The Dirty Dog". Written in the 60's by author Gene Zion, this little dog is loved by his masters. They cherish him and then one day he runs off on an adventure. Gets dirtier and dirtier as the day goes on. When he finally returns to his family home, they don't recognize him he is so dirty. But they love him and give him a bath and rejoice that their little lost dog has come home! Lots of opportunity for teaching in these little books. Pictures are simple and precious. We love the books so much we now have a miniature Jack Russell Terrier named "Harry" that lives at our house!

    By Blogger Snapshot, at 11/02/2005 05:28:00 AM  

  • Surely "The Cat in the Hat" is the best bedtime book ever.

    By Blogger Emily, at 11/02/2005 05:50:00 AM  

  • We're all about "Horton Hatches the Egg" over here. That, and all the musical numbers from "Moby Dick." :-)

    By Blogger Matt Elliott, at 11/02/2005 05:54:00 AM  

  • "When I Was Little: a four-year- old's memoir of her youth" by Jamie Lee Curtis is a classic at our house full of little women.

    By Blogger Amy, at 11/02/2005 06:16:00 AM  

  • As a kid, my fav was Marvin K. Mooney, Will You Please Go Now. Now, I love Horton Hears a Who, The Sneetches, and The Lorax. My 15 month old loves The Foot Book (flap book version).

    By Blogger Kate, at 11/02/2005 06:31:00 AM  

  • I was always amazed by "Ten Apples Up On Top!" but "Go, Dog, Go!" was definitely towards the top of my list only to be preceded by "Green Eggs and Ham". My daughter is "studying" that in pre-school this week.

    By Blogger John, at 11/02/2005 06:47:00 AM  

  • Emily, I've a feeling that you like me, live[d] with a house full of little girls. "Cat in the Hat" was also our favorite.

    By Blogger Kathy, at 11/02/2005 06:51:00 AM  

  • Wasn't "Go, Dog, Go" written by P.D.Eastman? I used to draw the cover all the time. My Favorite Suess is Oh, The Places You'll Go. I love ALL the Suess stuff. Its material I can understand.

    By Blogger Randy, at 11/02/2005 06:57:00 AM  

  • AHhh, you guys! Mike's right on the money on "Go, Dog Go." I'm with him 100%.

    Of course, that may be because I still have a strip of reel to reel tape (yep - reel to reel!!) with my older son's 3 year old voice on it "reading" Go, Dog Go to my dad at their house on the farm at Abernathy and trying to tell about the dog getting on the big yellow helicopter.

    He couldn't pronounce the Ys or the Hs very well, so it came out as "ello, ello, ello ellocopter."

    For all of his eloquence now as an adult and all of his accomplishments, I still love that tape with his voice and my dad laughing the very best.

    By Blogger Dee O'Neil Andrews, at 11/02/2005 07:06:00 AM  

  • I use C.S. Lewis' writings in a course I teach on business ethics (yes, much of his writing is relevant to business ethics). Last spring I took the course on the road to England for some business tours. However, we started off in Oxford and the students were able to get a tour of Lewis' home, The Kilns. They were also able to wander through the woods at the back of the house that served, in part, as the inspiration for Narnia. We also got to see the room at the Eagle and Child where the Inklings used to meet. What conversations those must have been with Lewis, Tolkien, and the rest. I didn't grow up with any exposure to Lewis' works, but I have certainly come to appreciate him now.

    By Blogger Jim Shelton, at 11/02/2005 07:15:00 AM  

  • Sorry, Dee. "I meant what I said, and I said what I meant. I'm faithful to Horton -- one hundred per cent!"

    By Blogger Matt Elliott, at 11/02/2005 07:19:00 AM  

  • OK, I know this is odd, but it says a lot about me.

    The first nightmare I ever had came because of "Go Dogs Go." I don't know why. I probably had a big soda before going to bed or something. But today, some 35 years later, I still remember that dream. See, those stinking dogs were chasing ME. Up that tree. To the dog party. I woke screaming. So, no, that's not one of my favorites.

    Unfortunately, it is one of my 4-year-old's favorites. So every now and then, I suck it up and read it to him. Brrrrrrrrrr.

    I'm a "Green Eggs and Ham" man myself. No chase scenes.

    By Blogger Thurman8er, at 11/02/2005 07:20:00 AM  

  • I have a tape recording of my now 25 year old reading along out loud to One Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish...very precious indeed.

    Sam's has all the books mentioned bundled in three's, it is hard to decide which ones to buy for the grandchild.

    The Cat in the Hat scared me, I knew how much trouble those kids were going to be in when their mother got home.

    By Blogger Hoots Musings, at 11/02/2005 07:49:00 AM  

  • I was scared of the cat in the hat when I was little! But I was totally into the whoze-it and whatzits with Stars upon thars! We love "Mr Brown can Moo" and "The Foot Book" in our house. I used to use and do use "I saw it on Mulberry Street" to talk about the difference between being creative and thinking up fun stories, and telling things that are not tru. When kids tell a big whopper I ask if that was real or they sw it on Mulberry street.

    By Blogger SG, at 11/02/2005 07:57:00 AM  

  • My daughter gave me a copy of "Hop on Pop" for Father's Day when she was two just so she could hop on me. Stop, stop, don't hop on Pop! But the book she really loves is "Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day." Mom says some days are like that. Even in Australia.

    By Blogger Stephen Bailey, at 11/02/2005 08:43:00 AM  

  • Ok, I thought the whole Kudos thing was a little weird but Dr. Suess too? I love "Go, Dog, Go" and I am usually the one asking Sophia if I can read it to her rather than the other way around.

    By Blogger Laura, at 11/02/2005 09:00:00 AM  

  • I had not read "Oh, The Places You'll Go" until just a few moments ago. What a great mantra!

    By Blogger J A Pierpont, at 11/02/2005 09:32:00 AM  

  • i'm leaving my narnia message today. beautiful, magical land where aslan lived to love his creation and his little kings and queens. oh delightful lewis and his child-like clarity in telling the story of Jesus and His salvation of the world.

    By Blogger serendipity, at 11/02/2005 09:37:00 AM  

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    By Blogger Crista, at 11/02/2005 09:50:00 AM  

  • Has anybody else ever heard of "Cowboy Andy"?

    Growing up during the Western craze, any book about a kid becoming a cowboy was just about every boy's dream. It was mine, anyway.

    DU

    By Blogger David U, at 11/02/2005 09:51:00 AM  

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    By Blogger Crista, at 11/02/2005 09:51:00 AM  

  • Where The Wild Things are was my favorite and now both of my boys like it as well. Not that I brain washed them or anything.

    By Blogger Jeremy Houck <>, at 11/02/2005 10:04:00 AM  

  • P.D. Eastman is Dr. Seuss as well as Theo LeSieg. He wrote under several pseudonyms. Foot book was the favorite here; a well-chewed copy rests in the memory box out in the shop. My husband likes teaching Revelation by starting with Yertle the Turtle, a hidden message of Hitler and his greed.

    By Blogger Angel, at 11/02/2005 10:54:00 AM  

  • Am I the only one who's ever noticed all the double entendres in "Green Eggs and Ham?"

    I quote:

    "Would you, could you, in a car?" (p. 26)

    "Could you, would you, with a goat?" (p. 42)

    I, for one, am disgusted.

    By Blogger Deana Nall, at 11/02/2005 11:41:00 AM  

  • My favorite when I was little was Robert Louis Stevenson's A Child's Garden of Verses...The Swing, The Seaside, The Land of Counterpane, and the poem that goes something like this...The world is full of a number of things, I am sure we should all be as happy as kings. I can still recite The Swing and The Seaside.
    My kids had many favorites...
    Corey-Where the Wild Things Are. Our friend Ted Thomas read it to him in German once and it is scary in German. Corey's eyes were huge by the time he was done.
    Drew's favorites were all the Bill Peet books.
    The girls both loved anything by Patricia Polacco and Robert McCloskey's Blueberries for Sal.
    We all loved Make Way for Ducklings so much that we went to Boston to see the little duckling statues and ride the swan boats.
    Thanks Mike. You have reminded me of some favorited memories.

    By Blogger julie, at 11/02/2005 11:51:00 AM  

  • My favorite when I was little was Robert Louis Stevenson's A Child's Garden of Verses...The Swing, The Seaside, The Land of Counterpane, and the poem that goes something like this...The world is full of a number of things, I am sure we should all be as happy as kings. I can still recite The Swing and The Seaside.
    My kids had many favorites...
    Corey-Where the Wild Things Are. Our friend Ted Thomas read it to him in German once and it is scary in German. Corey's eyes were huge by the time he was done.
    Drew's favorites were all the Bill Peet books.
    The girls both loved anything by Patricia Polacco and Robert McCloskey's Blueberries for Sal.
    We all loved Make Way for Ducklings so much that we went to Boston to see the little duckling statues and ride the swan boats.
    Thanks Mike. You have reminded me of some favorited memories.

    By Blogger julie, at 11/02/2005 11:56:00 AM  

  • This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    By Blogger Crista, at 11/02/2005 12:06:00 PM  

  • Having spent a lot of time in the Texas Panhandle growing up, high on my list of books to read my grandchildren is the Hank the Cowdog series by John Erickson. Fun.

    By Blogger Tom Chapin, at 11/02/2005 01:22:00 PM  

  • Even today if I ask my nephew, "Do you like my hat?" He will reply, "I do not like that hat."

    Good bye

    By Blogger That Girl, at 11/02/2005 03:19:00 PM  

  • Asking me name to favorite children's books is absolutely impossible in the time and space constraints here. I am in Children's Lit this semester and am discovering all kinds of great treasures out there in the world of children's books, and I am rediscovering old familiar favorites as well.

    My favorite memories of baby-sitting Chris involve looking through I Spy books with him. He was always so good at finding everything...much better than me! :)

    By Blogger Heather A, at 11/02/2005 03:59:00 PM  

  • "The Best Nest" hmmm, fills my heart with joy just to think about it.

    By Blogger Sue, at 11/02/2005 07:33:00 PM  

  • I love Cat in the Hat and Green Eggs and Ham both. In second grade I get to read books like that all the time.

    I gave Oh The Places You Will Go to my daughter last year when she graduated from Harding.

    By Blogger Paul, at 11/02/2005 08:23:00 PM  

  • I read the Narnia books when I was in college 30 years ago. I discovered Narnia when I read them to my 4 year old daughter, Meghan, 20 years ago. What a magical experience. Meghan and Lewis took me away from being all "grown up" and back to having the heart of a child.

    By Blogger Leon Morris, at 11/02/2005 09:54:00 PM  

  • "Old Hat, New Hat"! I can quote it still today. No fair trying to skip a page either. I think that may be why I learned to read at age 4. I didn't trust my parents after memorizing that book and KNOWING they were trying to speed thing up by skipping pages. "Put Me In the Zoo" was a close second.
    And....if you miss reading to children....I charge very little to rent mine out.

    Cari Bonneau

    By Blogger Cari Bonneau, at 11/05/2005 08:19:00 PM  

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